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Cloud Functions


Introduction In this post, you’ll learn to build a Java based Cloud Function that will connect to a Cloud SQL for SQL Server database using the Cloud SQL Connector for Java. This solution will help you learn to build event driven lightweight solutions for any stand-alone functionality with Cloud SQL database that respond to Cloud …

For over seven years, Functions-as-a-Service has changed how developers create solutions and move toward a programmable cloud. Functions made it easy for developers to build highly scalable, easy-to-understand, loosely-coupled services. But as these services evolved, developers faced challenges such as cold starts, latency, connecting disparate sources, and managing costs. In response, we are evolving Cloud …

Apache Spark has become a popular platform as it can serve all of data engineering, data exploration, and machine learning use cases. However, Spark still requires the on-premises way of managing clusters and tuning infrastructure for each job. This increases costs, reduces agility, and makes governance extremely hard; prohibiting enterprises from making insights available to …

March 14 is Pi Day, an annual celebration of the mathematical constant π. We’re doing a few experiments with the new Cloud Functions (2nd gen) this year to showcase the new serverless platform. Serverless π calculation Can we go serverless to calculate π? There is a relatively new algorithm called the Bailey–Borwein–Plouffe formula (BBP formula) to calculate digits of …

We are introducing Cloud Functions (2nd gen) into public preview, Google Cloud’s next-generation Functions-as-a-Service product. This next generation version of Cloud Functions comes with an advanced feature set giving you more powerful infrastructure, advanced control over performance and scalability, more control around the functions runtime and triggers from over 90 event sources. Further, the infrastructure …

At enterprises across industries, documents are at the center of core business processes. Documents store a treasure trove of valuable information whether it’s a company’s invoices, HR documents, tax forms and much more. However, the unstructured nature of documents make them difficult to work with as a data source. We call this “dark data” or …

Over the past several weeks, you’ve seen a collection of the most common questions and misconceptions the Cloud Functions Support team sees about Cloud Functions. Here is a recap of these most common “anti-patterns” and what you should do instead:   How to write event-driven Cloud Functions properly by coding with idempotency in mind: We explored …

The term “serverless” has infiltrated most cloud conversations, shorthand for the natural evolution of cloud-native computing, complete with many productivity, efficiency and simplicity benefits. The advent of modern “Functions as a Service” platforms like AWS Lambda and Google Cloud Functions heralded a new way of thinking about cloud-based applications: a move away from monolithic, slow-moving …

Editor’s note: Over the past several weeks, we’ve posted a series of blog posts focusing on best practices for writing Google Cloud Functions based on common questions or misconceptions as seen by the Support team.  We refer to these as “anti-patterns” and offer you ways to avoid them.  This article is the fifth post in …

Google Cloud Functions provides a simple and intuitive developer experience to execute code from Google Cloud, Firebase, Google Assistant, or any web, mobile, or backend application. Oftentimes that code needs secrets—like API keys, passwords, or certificates—to authenticate to or invoke upstream APIs and services. While Google Secret Manager is a fully-managed, secure, and convenient storage system for such …